Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Citations, Plagiarism, and Intellectual Property: Chicago Format

There are 2 styles to choose from when using Chicago -- you need to ask your professor which style he or she would like you to use. The main differences between the styles are where the references are placed, where the dates are placed, and how the titles are capitalized.

The notes and bibliography system is preferred by many working in the humanities—including literature, history, and the arts. In this system, sources are cited in numbered footnotes or endnotes. Each note corresponds to a raised (superscript) number in the text. Sources are also usually listed in a separate bibliography. The notes and bibliography system can accommodate a wide variety of sources, including unusual ones that don’t fit neatly into the author-date system.

In-text example:

He argues that "in an uncertain world, printed materials can be put to use in ways that make them powerful."1

Magazine Article (Online)

Reference or Bibliography page 
  Author Last, First. "Title." Magazine Name, Month Day, Year. Accessed (Month, Day,Year)

One Author 

Fletcher, Laura. “When mom is in prison": Supporting Incarcerated Women and Their Children.” U.S. Catholic. 2014. 79 (1): 22. Accessed August 24, 2020. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=102911726&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Footnotes 
Author First and Last Name, "Title of Article," Magazine Name, Month Day, Year, page number cited. (Permalink)  

1. Laura Fletcher,. “When Mom is in prison: Supporting Incarcerated Women and Their Children.” U.S. Catholic. 2014. 79 (1): 22. Accessed August 24, 2020. 22
2. Fletcher,. “When mom was in prison: Supporting Incarcerated Women and Their Children.” 22
3. Fletcher. 22

 

Multi Authors  

Reference or Bibliography page 
  Author Last, First. "Title." Magazine Name, Month Day, Year. Accessed (Month, Day,Year)

Example :
Kendall, S., S. Lighton, J. Sherwood, E. Baldry, and E. A. Sullivan. “Incarcerated Aboriginal Women’s Experiences of Accessing Healthcare and the Limitations of the ‘Equal Treatment’ Principle.” International Journal for Equity in Health 2020.  19 (1): 1–14.  Accessed August 24, 2020. ttps://ezmlp.moval.edu/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=142553233&site=ehost-live&scope=site 

[*Note: Bibliographic citations do not require inclusive page numbers for an article, although these may be included. Page numbers cited should be included in the note.]

Footnotes 
Author First and Last Name, "Title of Article," Magazine Name, Month Day, Year, page number cited. (Permalink)  

Example :
1. S. Kendall, S. Lighton, et al.,. “Incarcerated Aboriginal Women’s Experiences of Accessing Healthcare and the Limitations of the ‘Equal Treatment’ Principle.” International Journal for Equity in Health 2020.  19 (1): 3.  Accessed August 24, 2020.  

2. Lighton, et al.,. “Incarcerated Aboriginal Women’s Experiences of Accessing Healthcare and the Limitations of the ‘Equal Treatment’ Principle.” 4

3. Lighton et al.,. 8


Book  - One Author

Reference or Bibliography page 

Author’s Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Name of Publisher, year of publication.

Example:

Muraskin, Roslyn. Women and justice: it's a crime. Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson Education/Prentice Hall, c2012

Footnotes 

Author’s First and Last Name, Title of Book (Place of Publication: Name of Publisher, year of publication), page(s) cited.

Example:
1. Roslyn Muraskin. Women and justice: it's a crime. Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson Education/Prentice Hall, c2012, 45
2. Muraskin. Women and justice: it's a crime, 65
3. Muraskin, 20